Inherited IRA Calculator For Beneficiaries

Shawn Plummer, CRPC

Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor

Inherited IRA calculator

As the beneficiary of a retirement account, specific regulations mandated by the Internal Revenue Service determine your minimum withdrawals. Therefore, if you wish to delay taxes as much as possible, these must be followed precisely. Luckily, this Inherited IRA Calculator simplifies things by helping you determine exactly what your Required Minimum Distributions (RMD) should be! So why not take advantage and start planning for a tax-deferred future today?

Inherited Rmd Calculator

What is an Inherited IRA?

An inherited IRA, also known as a beneficiary IRA, is transferred from a deceased individual to a beneficiary. This transfer allows the funds in the IRA to continue growing tax-deferred or tax-free (in the case of a Roth IRA), depending on the original account type.

Types of Inherited IRAs

There are two primary categories of Inherited IRAs: Traditional and Roth

Traditional IRAs: Traditional IRAs are composed of pre-tax contributions, meaning that withdrawals by beneficiaries are subject to income tax.

Roth IRAs: Roth IRAs are funded with after-tax dollars. This setup allows the funds within a Roth IRA to grow tax-free, and distributions taken by beneficiaries are also tax-free, alleviating concerns about additional tax burdens from these withdrawals.

Inherited Ira Rmd Calculator 2023

Inherited IRA Distributions Rules

When you inherit an IRA (Individual Retirement Account), it’s essential to understand the specific rules and options available for managing these funds. The rules can differ based on whether you are a spouse, a non-spouse, or a non-person entity such as a trust

Spousal Inheritance of IRAs Rules

Inheriting an IRA from your spouse provides several flexible options for managing these funds. Whether the IRA is Traditional or Roth, and regardless of whether RMDs have started, you have specific choices based on your financial needs and future plans.

Spouse Inherits Traditional IRA

Option #1: Spousal Transfer (Treat as Your Own)
  • What Happens: You transfer the assets into your own IRA, either existing or new.
  • Access to Money: It is available at any time, though a 10% penalty applies to withdrawals before age 59½.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Sole beneficiary only.
    • Assets grow tax-deferred.
    • Subject to standard IRA distribution rules.
    • Designate your own IRA beneficiaries.
    • If RMDs have been started, you must take an RMD for the year of death if the account holder has not.
Option #2: Open an Inherited IRA (Life Expectancy Method)
  • What Happens: Assets are transferred into an Inherited IRA in your name.
  • Access to Money: RMDs must begin by the later of the decedent’s 73rd birthday year or December 31 of the year following their death.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Annual distributions are based on your recalculated life expectancy.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.
    • Continued tax-deferred growth.
    • Mandatory for separate accounts if multiple beneficiaries.
    • If RMDs have been started, you must continue taking them, and they are taxed on each distribution.
Option #3: Open an Inherited IRA (10-Year Method)
  • What Happens: Assets are transferred to an Inherited IRA.
  • Access to Money: Full distribution is required by December 31 of the tenth year following the death.
  • Key Considerations:
    • No RMDs are required annually, but a full balance must be distributed by the end of the 10-year period.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.
    • Allows tax-deferred growth for up to ten years.
Option #4: Lump Sum Distribution
  • What Happens: Immediate full distribution.
  • Access to Money: Immediately.
  • Key Considerations:
    • The full amount is taxable as income.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.
    • May increase your tax bracket significantly.
Option #5: Roll Over and Convert to a Roth IRA
  • What Happens: First, roll over into a Traditional IRA, then convert to a Roth IRA.
  • Access to Money: Taxes due at conversion, no penalties for conversion.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Ideal if expecting to be in a higher tax bracket in the future.
    • You should use taxable assets to cover the taxes incurred from the conversion
    • No RMDs are required for Roth IRAs, allowing for continued tax-free growth.
Option #6: Disclaim the Inheritance
  • What Happens: Refuse all or part of the inherited assets.
  • Access to Money: Assets pass to other beneficiaries.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Useful for estate planning if accepting the assets would exceed tax exemptions.
    • The decision must be made within 9 months of the spouse’s death and before taking any distributions.
    • Irrevocable once made.

Spouse Inherits Roth IRA

Option #1: Spousal Transfer (Treat as Your Own)
  • What Happens: Transfer the assets into your own Roth IRA.
  • Access to Money: Withdrawals of earnings might be taxable if taken before 5 years of account opening and before age 59½.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Sole beneficiary only.
    • Subject to Roth IRA distribution rules.
    • You can designate your own IRA beneficiaries.
Option #2: Open an Inherited Roth IRA (Life Expectancy Method)
  • What Happens: Transfer assets into an Inherited Roth IRA.
  • Access to Money: Mandatory RMDs can be postponed until the later of Dec 31, the following year of death, or when the deceased would have turned 73.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Distributions are based on the beneficiary’s single life expectancy.
    • Tax-free provided the original Roth was funded for at least 5 years.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.
    • You can designate your own beneficiaries.
Option #3: Open an Inherited Roth IRA (10-Year Method)
  • What Happens: Assets are transferred to an Inherited Roth IRA.
  • Access to Money: Anytime until December 31 of the tenth year post-death.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Tax-free growth continues for up to ten years.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.
    • Withdrawals of contributions always tax-free; earnings are tax-free if the five-year holding period has been met.
Option #4: Lump Sum Distribution
  • What Happens: Immediate full distribution.
  • Access to Money: Immediately.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Earnings are taxable if the account is less than five years old at the time of the original owner’s death.
Option #5: Disclaim the Inheritance
  • What Happens: Refuse all or part of the inherited assets.
  • Access to Money: Assets pass to other beneficiaries.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Useful for estate planning if accepting the assets would exceed tax exemptions.
    • The decision must be made within 9 months of the spouse’s death and before taking any distributions.
    • Irrevocable once made.
Tax Rate On Inherited Ira Lump Sum Calculator

Non-Spousal Inherited IRA Rules

When a non-spouse inherits an IRA, the available options are largely dictated by the beneficiary’s classification—either a Designated Beneficiary or an Eligible Designated Beneficiary. Each category faces different rules and options based on whether the inherited IRA is Traditional or Roth and whether the original account holder started their Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs).

Designated Beneficiaries

Designated Beneficiaries are typically friends, non-relative individuals, or entities such as charities or estates who do not qualify as Eligible Designated Beneficiaries. Their options are simplified but restricted and apply to both Traditional and Roth IRAs:

Option #1: 10-Year Full Distribution
  • What Happens: The money is transfered into an Inherited IRA.
  • Access to Money: Anytime until December 31 of the tenth year following the year of death.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Assets must be fully distributed by the end of the 10th year.
    • No early withdrawal penalty applies.
    • If the original account holder was taking RMDs, these must continue throughout the 10-year period.
Option #2: Lump Sum Distribution
  • What happens: The lump sum of the account is dispersed to the beneficiaries
  • Access to Money: Immediate.
  • Key Considerations:
    • For traditional IRAs, the entire amount is taxable in the year of distribution; tax implications for Roth IRAs depend on the five-year holding period.
Option #3: Disavow the Account
  • What Happens: You refuse the IRA
  • Key Considerations:
    • This decision must be made within 9 months of the original account holder’s death and before any distributions are taken.
    • This is an irrevocable decision that lets the IRA assets pass to the contingent beneficiaries or become part of the estate if there are no additional beneficiaries.

Eligible Designated Beneficiaries

Eligible Designated Beneficiaries include minor children of the decedent, chronically ill individuals, permanently disabled individuals, and those not more than 10 years younger than the decedent. These beneficiaries have more flexible options:

Roth IRA: Options for Eligible Designated Beneficiaries

Option #1: Open an Inherited Roth IRA (Life Expectancy Method)
  • Account Type: Inherited Roth IRA in your name.
  • Access to Money: Mandatory RMDs begin by December 31 of the year following the year of death.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Distributions are based on your single life expectancy.
    • Tax-free distributions if the original five-year holding period has been met.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.
    • Assets can continue growing tax-free.
    • Separate accounts are required by December 31 of the year following the death of multiple beneficiaries.
Option #2: Open an Inherited Roth IRA (10-Year Method)
  • Account Type: Inherited Roth IRA.
  • Access to Money: Anytime, with all assets distributed by December 31 of the tenth year following the death.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Distributions are tax-free if the five-year holding period is met.
    • Allows for flexible distribution timing within the ten-year window.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.
    • Continued tax-free growth for up to ten years.
Option #3: Lump Sum Distribution
  • Account Type: None.
  • Access to Money: Immediate.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Tax-free if the five-year holding period is met.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.

Traditional IRA: Options for Eligible Designated Beneficiaries

Option #1: Open an Inherited IRA (Life Expectancy Method)
  • What Happens: Funds are transferred into a new inherited IRA account in your name.
  • Access to Money: RMDs must start by December 31 of the year after the death.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Distributions are based on your single life expectancy or the deceased’s remaining life expectancy, whichever is longer.
    • Taxed upon distribution.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.
    • Assets can continue growing tax-deferred.
    • Separate accounts are required for multiple beneficiaries.
    • If the beneficiary is a minor, once they reach age 21, they must convert to the 10-year method.
    • RMDs are mandatory.
Option #2: Lump Sum Distribution
  • What Happens: You take the money in the IRA account as a lump sum payment.
  • Access to Money: Immediate.
  • Key Considerations:
    • The entire distribution is taxable in the year taken.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.
    • Potential to increase your tax bracket due to the lump sum amount.
Option #3: Disavow the Account
  • Account Type: None.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Must be made within 9 months of the account holder’s death and before taking any distributions.
    • This is an irrevocable decision allowing IRA assets to pass to other beneficiaries.

Roth IRA: Options for Eligible Designated Beneficiaries

Option #1: Open an Inherited Roth IRA (Life Expectancy Method)
  • What Happens: The Roth IRA is converted to an Inherited Roth IRA in your name.
  • Access to Money: Mandatory RMDs begin by December 31 of the year following the year of death.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Distributions are based on your single life expectancy.
    • Tax-free distributions if the original five-year holding period has been met.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.
    • Assets can continue growing tax-free.
    • For multiple beneficiaries, separate accounts are required by December 31 of the year following the account holder’s death.
    • If the beneficiary is a minor, once they reach age 21, they must convert to the 10-year method.

Option #2: Open an Inherited Roth IRA (10-Year Method)

  • What Happens: The IRA is converted to an Inherited Roth IRA.
  • Access to Money: Anytime, with all assets distributed by December 31 of the tenth year following the death.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Distributions are tax-free if the five-year holding period is met.
    • Allows for flexible distribution timing within the ten-year window.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.
    • Continued tax-free growth for up to ten years.

Option #3: Lump Sum Distribution

  • What Happens: Money is distributed as a lump sum payment.
  • Access to Money: Immediate.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Tax-free if the five-year holding period is met.
    • No early withdrawal penalty.
Option #4: Disavow the Account
  • What Happens: You give up access to the account.
  • Key Considerations:
    • Must be made within 9 months of the account holder’s death and before taking any distributions.
    • This is an irrevocable decision allowing IRA assets to pass to other beneficiaries.

How We Can Help

At The Annuity Expert, we understand the complexities of managing an inherited IRA. For 15 years, we’ve been providing personalized solutions tailored to individual needs and preferences, ensuring our clients feel valued and supported. We recognize that navigating RMDs can be overwhelming, and our goal is to simplify this process for you, finding the best solution at the lowest costs.

Understanding Your Challenges

We know that dealing with an inherited IRA can bring about numerous emotional and financial challenges. The fear of penalties, the confusion around tax implications, and the pressure of timely compliance can be daunting. By using our expertise, we help alleviate these worries, guiding you through each step with clarity and confidence.

Our Commitment

Our mission is to empower you with knowledge and tools to make informed decisions about your inherited IRA. We stand for transparency, personalized service, and dedication to your financial well-being. Our Inherited IRA RMD Calculator is designed to provide you with accurate, timely information to ensure you meet your RMD obligations without stress.

What We Recommend

Step 1: Calculate Your RMD

  • Use our Inherited IRA RMD Calculator to determine your required distribution amount. Enter your IRA balance, age, and beneficiary type to get an accurate figure. This step ensures you know exactly how much you need to withdraw, helping you avoid penalties and stay compliant.
  • Main Benefit: Peace of mind knowing your RMD amount is calculated correctly.

Step 2: Plan Your Withdrawal Strategy

  • Once you have your RMD amount, we can help you devise a withdrawal strategy that minimizes tax impact and aligns with your financial goals. We’ll discuss your options, including potential tax-saving strategies and ways to manage your distributions effectively.
  • Main Benefit: Optimized tax strategy and better financial planning.

Step 3: Implement and Monitor

  • With your plan in place, we’ll assist you in executing it, ensuring all distributions are made on time. We’ll also provide ongoing support and monitoring, adjusting your strategy as needed to adapt to any changes in your financial situation or tax laws.
  • Main Benefit: Continuous support and adjustments to keep your plan on track.

Features and Benefits

  • Accurate Calculations: Ensures compliance and avoids penalties.
  • Personalized Strategies: Tailored to your unique financial situation.
  • Ongoing Support: Continuous guidance and adjustments as needed.
  • Tax Optimization: Strategies to minimize your tax burden.

Addressing Common Objections

Some may feel they can manage their inherited IRA on their own or worry about the cost of professional advice. However, the complexities and potential penalties associated with RMDs make professional guidance invaluable. By working with us, you ensure compliance, optimize your tax strategy, and gain peace of mind.

Failing to properly manage your inherited IRA can result in significant penalties, unnecessary tax burdens, and missed financial opportunities. By partnering with us, you secure a trusted advisor who prioritizes your financial well-being, providing clarity, support, and effective strategies.

Positive Outcomes

By choosing The Annuity Expert, you can look forward to a well-managed inherited IRA, minimized tax impact, and a secure financial future. You will experience relief from the stress of compliance, confidence in your financial decisions, and a strong sense of financial security.

Contact us today for free advice or a personalized quote. We’re here to help you navigate your inherited IRA with ease and confidence.

Inherited Ira Rmd Calculator

Get Free Inherited IRA Guidance

Get help from a licensed financial professional. This service is free of charge.

Contact Us
First
Last

Questions From Our Readers

Can you aggregate RMDs from inherited IRAs?

If you benefit from multiple inherited IRAs from one decedent, you can pool the required minimum distributions (RMDs) into a single account and withdraw from that. However, if those accounts were provided to you through various decedents, combining RMDs is not permitted.

What is the IRS penalty for not taking an RMD from an inherited IRA?

Suppose you inherited an IRA subject to the 10-Year Rule and neglected to remove your Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) in 2024. Unfortunately, you will be subjected to a 25% penalty for the amount that should have been withdrawn.

What is the five-year rule for inherited IRA RMD?

You must adhere to the 5-Year Rule of Inherited IRAs if you withdraw any earnings from such an account. This rule states that the IRA must have been established at least five years before the passing away of its original holder for withdrawals to be valid.

What is the inherited IRA RMD table?

The Inherited IRA RMD table is a financial tool used to calculate the Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) from an inherited IRA. It provides a schedule based on the beneficiary’s age and life expectancy. This table helps beneficiaries plan their withdrawals and ensure compliance with IRS regulations.

Shawn Plummer, CRPC

Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor

Shawn Plummer is a Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor, insurance agent, and annuity broker with over 14 years of first-hand experience with annuities and insurance. Since beginning his journey in 2009, he has been pivotal in selling and educating about annuities and insurance products. Still, he has also played an instrumental role in training financial advisors for a prestigious Fortune Global 500 insurance company, Allianz. His insights and expertise have made him a sought-after voice in the industry, leading to features in renowned publications such as Time Magazine, Bloomberg, Entrepreneur, Yahoo! Finance, MSN, SmartAsset, The Simple Dollar, U.S. News and World Report, Women’s Health Magazine, and many more. Shawn’s driving ambition? To simplify retirement planning, he ensures his clients understand their choices and secure the best insurance coverage at unbeatable rates.

The Annuity Expert is an independent online insurance agency servicing consumers across the United States. The goal is to help you take the guesswork out of retirement planning and find the best insurance coverage at the cheapest rates

Scroll to Top