What Is OASDI And How Does It Work?

Shawn Plummer, CRPC

Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor

Social Security is a vital component of the American social safety net. One of the most critical components of Social Security is the Old Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program. OASDI is an essential program that provides financial support to people who cannot work due to old age, disability, or the death of a breadwinner. In this guide, we’ll explore what OASDI is, how it works, and what benefits it offers.

Understanding OASDI

Old Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance Program (OASDI) is a federal government program that provides financial assistance to retired, disabled, or deceased workers and their dependents. The program is funded by payroll taxes, which are deducted from the salaries of working Americans. The funds collected from payroll taxes are then used to benefit eligible recipients.

What Is Oasdi?

History of OASDI

The Social Security Act was signed into law in 1935 during the Great Depression. The OASDI program was created as part of the Social Security Act to provide financial support to the elderly, disabled, and their dependents. Since its inception, OASDI has become an essential Social Security program for millions of Americans.

Goals of OASDI

The primary goal of OASDI is to provide financial security to eligible individuals and their dependents. In addition, OASDI aims to help people maintain their standard of living in retirement or the event of disability or death.

How OASDI Works

The OASDI program is a pay-as-you-go system. This means that the funds collected from payroll taxes are immediately used to benefit eligible recipients. The Social Security Administration (SSA) oversees the program and is responsible for collecting payroll taxes, processing benefit claims, and managing the program’s finances.

OASDI pays monthly benefits to retired individuals and their families, as well as to surviving spouses and children of workers who have died. The Social Security benefits are extended to disabled workers and their dependents as well.

Funding for OASDI

The OASDI program is funded through payroll taxes. OASDI tax is part of Federal Insurance Contributions Act taxes, used to pay for Social Security and Medicare.

The OASDI tax is collected from both employees and employers. Currently, the Social Security tax rate is 12.4%, with 6.2% paid by the employee and 6.2% paid by the employer. Self-employed individuals also pay OASDI taxes (as a part of their Self-Employment tax), and their rate amounts to 12.4%. The Social Security Administration determines how high the OASDI tax will be every year.

It’s important to mention here that a limit is placed on Social Security taxes. This limit is set via the maximum level of taxable income. For the 2022 tax year, the taxable income limit is $147,000; in the 2023 tax year, this number will amount to $160,200.

This, however, does not extend to Medicare taxes, which have no similar limit set.

Benefits of OASDI

The OASDI program provides several Social Security benefits to eligible individuals and their dependents. These benefits include retirement benefits, disability benefits, and survivor benefits.

OASDI Benefits

The OASDI program provides several benefits to support eligible individuals and their dependents financially.

Retirement Benefits

Retirement benefits are the most common benefit provided by the OASDI program. These benefits are paid to individuals who have reached full retirement age and have worked enough years to qualify for benefits. The retirement benefits received are based on the individual’s lifetime earnings.

Disability Benefits

Disability benefits are provided to individuals who cannot work due to a physical or mental disability. To qualify for disability benefits, an individual must have a medical condition expected to last at least one year or result in death. The amount of disability benefits received is based on the individual’s lifetime earnings.

Oasdi Meaning

Eligibility for OASDI Benefits

To be eligible for OASDI benefits, an individual must meet specific criteria. These criteria vary depending on the type of benefit being sought.

Eligibility for Retirement Benefits

To be eligible for retirement benefits, an individual must have worked and paid into the OASDI program for several years. The number of years required varies depending on the individual’s date of birth. Additionally, the individual must have reached the full retirement age of 67 years old for those born after 1960.

Eligibility for Disability Benefits

To be eligible for disability benefits, an individual must have a medical condition that prevents them from engaging in substantial gainful activity. In addition, the condition must be expected to last at least one year or result in death. The individual must also have worked and paid into the OASDI program for a certain number of years, depending on their age at the time they became disabled. Finally, the individual must meet the SSA’s definition of disability, which includes medical and non-medical factors such as age, education, and work history.

Next Steps

The OASDI program is an essential component of the American social safety net. It provides financial assistance to millions of Americans who cannot work due to old age, disability, or the death of a breadwinner. Understanding how the program works and its benefits are crucial for anyone needing to rely on it in the future. By adopting a people-first approach to the content and focusing on how the information will benefit the reader, we hope to have provided a helpful and informative overview of the OASDI program.

Oasdi

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is OASDI, and what does it stand for?

OASDI stands for Old Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance. It is a federal program that provides retirement, survivor, and disability benefits to eligible individuals.

What is the difference between OASDI and Social Security?

There is no difference between OASDI and Social Security. OASDI is the official name for the Social Security program in the United States. Social Security and OASDI taxes are the same thing.

Is OASDI tax mandatory?

Yes, the OASDI tax is mandatory for nearly all working American citizens. The only people exempted from paying Social Security tax are academic workers or researchers without U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status, specific religious organizations, and self-employed individuals with income that does not surpass $400 annually.

Shawn Plummer, CRPC

Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor

Shawn Plummer is a Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor, insurance agent, and annuity broker with over 14 years of first-hand experience with annuities and insurance. Since beginning his journey in 2009, he has been pivotal in selling and educating about annuities and insurance products. Still, he has also played an instrumental role in training financial advisors for a prestigious Fortune Global 500 insurance company, Allianz. His insights and expertise have made him a sought-after voice in the industry, leading to features in renowned publications such as Time Magazine, Bloomberg, Entrepreneur, Yahoo! Finance, MSN, SmartAsset, The Simple Dollar, U.S. News and World Report, Women’s Health Magazine, and many more. Shawn’s driving ambition? To simplify retirement planning, he ensures his clients understand their choices and secure the best insurance coverage at unbeatable rates.

The Annuity Expert is an independent online insurance agency servicing consumers across the United States. The goal is to help you take the guesswork out of retirement planning and find the best insurance coverage at the cheapest rates

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