Roth IRA: Tax-Free Income in Retirement

Shawn Plummer, CRPC

Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor

What is a Roth IRA?

A Roth IRA is an individual retirement account that allows you to save for retirement while providing tax benefits. The main difference between a Roth IRA and a traditional IRA is how they are taxed. With a traditional IRA, you make contributions with pre-tax dollars, meaning you don’t pay taxes on the money until you withdraw it in retirement. With a Roth IRA, you make contributions with after-tax dollars, after income tax, but your retirement withdrawal is tax-free.

Basis In Roth Ira Contributions

How Does A Roth IRA Work?

A Roth IRA account is an individual retirement account (IRA) that provides tax-free growth and tax-free withdrawals in retirement. Here’s how it works:

  • Contributions: You can contribute up to a certain amount per year to your Roth IRA, depending on your age and income. For 2024, the maximum contribution is $7,000, or $8,000 if you’re 50 or older. In addition, you can make contributions up until the tax filing deadline for the previous year.
  • Investment options: Once you’ve contributed to your Roth IRA, you can choose how to invest the money. This can include stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and other investment vehicles.
  • Tax benefits: Unlike a traditional IRA, you don’t get a tax deduction for contributions to a Roth IRA. However, the earnings on your contributions grow tax-free, and withdrawals in retirement are also tax-free. This can provide significant tax savings in the long run.
  • Withdrawals: You can withdraw contributions from your Roth IRA at any time, tax-free and penalty-free. However, if you withdraw earnings before age 59 ½, you may owe income taxes and a 10% early withdrawal penalty. Once you reach age 59 ½, you can withdraw both contributions and earnings tax-free.
  • Eligibility: To contribute to a Roth IRA, you must have earned income, which must fall below a certain threshold. For 2024, the phase-out range is $146,000 to $161,000 for single filers and $230,000 to $240,000 for married filing jointly.
What Is A Roth Ira?

What Are The Benefits Of A Roth IRA?

A Roth IRA has several benefits that make it an attractive option for retirement savings:

  • Tax-free withdrawals: The most significant benefit of a Roth IRA is that your withdrawals in retirement are tax-free. Since you already paid taxes on the contributions, you don’t have to pay taxes again when you withdraw the money. This can save you a lot of money in taxes in the long run.
  • No required minimum distributions (RMDs): Unlike traditional IRAs, which require you to start taking withdrawals at a certain age, there are no RMDs with a Roth IRA. This means you can continue to let your money grow tax-free for as long as you want.
  • Flexible contributions: You can contribute to a Roth IRA at any age if you have earned income. You can also continue to make contributions after age 73, which is the age when traditional IRAs require you to stop contributing.
  • Estate planning benefits: A Roth IRA can be valuable since your beneficiaries can inherit the account tax-free. They will still have to take RMDs, but those distributions will also be tax-free.
  • Potential for tax diversification: By having a mix of traditional and Roth retirement accounts, you can create a more diversified tax strategy in retirement. This can help you manage your tax liability and maximize your retirement savings.
What To Know About Roth Iras

Who Qualifies for a Roth IRA?

To qualify for a Roth IRA, you must meet specific eligibility requirements. Here are the Roth IRA rules to consider:

  • Income: To contribute to a Roth IRA, your income must be below certain limits. For 2024, the maximum income limits are $161,000 for individuals and $240,000 for married couples filing jointly. If your income exceeds these limits, you may be able to make a partial contribution or consider other retirement savings options.
  • Age: There is no age limit for contributing to a Roth IRA. Unlike traditional IRAs, which require you to take required minimum distributions (RMDs) at 73, Roth IRAs have no RMDs. This means you can continue contributing to your account and let your money grow tax-free for as long as you like.
  • Income source: You must have earned income to contribute to a Roth IRA. This includes wages, salaries, tips, bonuses, and self-employment income. If you have investment income, such as interest, dividends, or capital gains, you cannot use that income to contribute to a Roth IRA.
  • Contribution limits: For 2024, the contribution limit for a Roth IRA is $7,000, with an additional catch-up contribution of $1,000 allowed for individuals aged 50 and older. This limit applies to your total contributions to all IRAs you own, including traditional IRAs.
  • Tax status: When you contribute to a Roth IRA, you do not get an immediate tax deduction. However, your contributions and earnings grow tax-free, and withdrawals in retirement are generally tax-free as well. This can be a valuable tax planning strategy, especially if you expect to be in a higher tax bracket in retirement than you are now.

How To Open A Roth IRA

Opening a Roth IRA is a fairly straightforward process. Here are the steps you need to follow:

  • Choose a custodian: A custodian is a financial institution that holds and manages your Roth IRA. You can choose from various custodians, including banks and brokerage firms.
  • Complete the account application: Once you’ve chosen a custodian, you must complete an account application. This will include personal information such as your name, address, Social Security number, and information about your employment and income.
  • Fund your account: After it is set up, you must fund it. You can contribute, transfer money from an existing retirement account, or rollover funds from a traditional IRA.
  • Choose your investments: Once your account is funded, you must choose how to invest the money. This can include stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and other investment vehicles. Your custodian may offer investment options, or you may need to work with a financial advisor to choose investments.
  • Review and manage your account: After your Roth IRA is up and running, reviewing and managing your account regularly is essential. This may include monitoring your investments, adjusting your contributions, and ensuring you’re on track to meet your retirement goals.

Roth IRA Pros And Cons

Here are some of the main advantages and disadvantages of Roth IRAs:

Pros

  • Tax-free withdrawals: Roth IRA contributions and earnings grow tax-free, and withdrawals in retirement are generally tax-free as well. This can be a valuable tax planning strategy, especially if you expect to be in a higher tax bracket in retirement than you are now.
  • No Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs): Unlike traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs have no RMDs. This means you can continue to contribute to your account and let you grow tax-free income.
  • Flexibility: Roth IRAs allow you to withdraw your contributions without penalty, making them a more flexible retirement savings option than other accounts.
  • Estate planning benefits: Roth IRAs can be a valuable tool for estate planning, as they allow you to leave tax-free assets to your heirs.

Cons

  • No upfront tax deduction: When you contribute to a Roth IRA, you do not get an immediate tax deduction, unlike with a traditional IRA. This means you’ll be paying taxes on the money you contribute upfront, which can disadvantage some investors.
  • Income limits: To contribute to a Roth IRA, your income must be below certain limits. If your income exceeds these limits, you may be able to make a partial contribution or consider other retirement savings options.
  • Contribution limits: For 2024, the contribution limit for a Roth IRA is $7,000, with an additional catch-up contribution of $1,000 allowed for individuals aged 50 and older. This limit applies to your total contributions to all IRAs you own, including traditional IRAs.
  • No guarantee of tax-free withdrawals: While Roth IRAs are designed to provide tax-free withdrawals in retirement, there is no guarantee that this will always be the case. Tax laws can change over time, and it’s possible that Congress could change the rules regarding Roth IRA withdrawals.

Roth IRA Income And Contribution Limits

To be eligible to contribute to a Roth IRA, your income must fall below a certain threshold. The contribution limit for 2023 is $6,500 per year or $7,500 if you’re 50 or older.

  • In 2024, the contribution limits for a Roth IRA have increased.
  • Individuals can contribute up to $7,000, up from $6,500 in 2023.
  • For those aged 50 and over, the cap is $8,000.

Here are the adjusted income limits for Roth IRA contributions

  • Single filers: You can fully contribute if your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) is less than $138,000. The contribution limit phases out between $138,000 and $153,000. If your MAGI is $153,000 or higher, you cannot contribute to a Roth IRA.
  • Married filing jointly: You can contribute fully if your MAGI is less than $218,000—the contribution limit phases out between $218,000 and $228,000. If your MAGI is $228,000 or higher, you cannot contribute to a Roth IRA.
  • Married filing separately: If you are married filing separately and lived with your spouse at any time during the year, your contribution limit phases out between $0 and $10,000. If your MAGI is $10,000 or higher, you cannot contribute to a Roth IRA.

Income Limits for Roth IRA Contributions In 2024

2024 Income Limits:

  • Individual: Full contribution if MAGI is less than $146,000; phase-out between $146,000 and $161,000; no contribution if MAGI is $161,000 or higher.
  • Married Couples Filing Jointly: Full contribution if MAGI is less than $230,000; phase-out between $230,000 and $240,000; no contribution if MAGI is $240,000 or higher.

Comparing Roth IRA Contribution Limits 2023 vs. 2024

YearStandard LimitLimit for 50 and OverIndividual Income Phase-Out StartIndividual Income Phase-Out EndMarried Couples Income Phase-Out StartMarried Couples Income Phase-Out End
2023$6,500$7,500$138,000$153,000$218,000$228,000
2024$7,000$8,000$146,000$161,000$230,000$240,000

How To Calculate Your Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI) For Roth IRA Eligibility

To determine your Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI), you must add certain deductions and exclusions to your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). Here is the formula for calculating your MAGI:

MAGI = AGI + (deductions and exclusions)

Some of the deductions and exclusions that you will need to add back to your AGI include the following:

  • Traditional IRA contributions
  • Student loan interest
  • Tuition and fees deduction
  • Foreign earned income exclusion

Who Can Not Contribute To A Roth IRA?

There are income limits to participating in this retirement plan for investors in a higher tax bracket. For example, suppose the annual income exceeds $161,000 in gross income as an individual’s or a married couple’s income exceeds $240,000 a year together. In that case, the joint filer cannot contribute to a Roth IRA.

You can not contribute to a Roth IRA if you do not receive earned income.

Roth IRA Basis Of Contributions

The contributions to a Roth are known as its IRA basis and can be withdrawn and used without tax. Contributions in Roth IRAs are free for you to use. You do not need to pay income tax on them to invest with them.

Roth IRA Withdrawal Rules

Here are some fundamental rules to keep in mind when considering Roth IRA withdrawals:

  • Age restrictions: You can withdraw money from your Roth IRA at any time, but if you’re under age 59 1/2 and you’ve had the account for less than five years, you may have to pay a 10% penalty on any earnings you withdraw in addition to ordinary income taxes. Some exceptions exist to this penalty, such as using the funds for certain qualified expenses like a first-time home purchase or qualified education expenses.
  • Required minimum distributions: Unlike traditional IRAs, Roth IRA accounts do not require you to take minimum distributions at age 73. You can leave your funds in the account as long as you like, and there are no penalties for not taking distributions.
  • Contribution rules: You can always withdraw your Roth IRA contributions tax and penalty-free anytime. However, you may be subject to taxes and penalties if you withdraw earnings before age 59 1/2 or before your account has been open for five years.
  • Conversion rules: If you convert funds from a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA, you must wait at least five years to withdraw the converted amount without penalty. If you withdraw the converted amount before the five years are up, you may have to pay the penalty on the earnings.
  • Tax considerations: Roth IRA withdrawals are generally tax-free. However, it’s important to remember that if you withdraw earnings before age 59 1/2 or before your account has been open for five years, you may have to pay taxes and penalties. Additionally, if you withdraw funds from a traditional IRA and convert them to a Roth IRA, you must pay taxes on the amount in the year of the conversion.
What Are Roth Iras

Allowable Investments in a Roth IRA

Here are some allowable investments in a Roth IRA:

  • Stocks: You can invest in individual stocks or mutual funds that invest in stocks. Stocks can provide the potential for long-term growth, but they can also be volatile and carry more risk.
  • Bonds: You can invest in individual bonds or bond funds. Bonds can provide a stable source of income and are generally less risky than stocks, but they may not offer as much growth potential.
  • Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs): ETFs are similar to mutual funds but trade like stocks on an exchange. They can provide exposure to a range of assets, including stocks, bonds, and commodities.
  • Real estate: You can invest in real estate investment trusts (REITs) or funds that invest in real estate. Real estate can provide a source of income and potential for long-term growth, but it can also be volatile.
  • Certificates of Deposit (CDs): CDs are a type of savings account that pays a fixed interest rate for a set period. They can provide a low-risk source of income, but the returns are generally lower than other investments.

What Type Of Money Can Be Contributed

Only earned income can be contributed to a Roth savings account.

W-2 Employees

If you are a W-2 employee, the money you make from your job can pay for a Roth IRA. Things like wages, salaries, commissions, and bonuses can all count.

Self-Employed

If you are self-employed, compensation is the individual’s net earnings from their business, less deduction allowed for contributions made to retirement plans on their behalf, and further reduced by 50% of the individual’s self-employment taxes.

Divorce

Money related to divorce can also be contributed. This is called alimony. Child support or money from a settlement can also be put in the account.

What Type of Money Can Not Be Contributed

The IRS limits the type of Roth IRA contributions that can be made to retirement accounts. These income sources are prohibited:

The Spousal Roth IRA

A Spousal Roth IRA is a type of individual retirement account that allows a married couple to take taxable income to contribute to an IRA in the name of a non-working spouse. This can be a valuable strategy for couples with one spouse who earns income and another who does not or who earns less income than the contribution limit for a traditional or Roth IRA.

Here are some key things to know about spousal Roth IRAs:

  • Eligibility: To contribute to a spousal Roth IRA, you must be married and file a joint tax return. The working spouse must have earned income that is at least equal to the amount of the contribution, and the non-working spouse must be under the age of 73.
  • Contribution limits: The contribution limit for a spousal Roth IRA is the same as for a regular Roth IRA. For 2024, the limit is $7,000, with an additional $1,000 catch-up contribution allowed for individuals aged 50 and older. After that, the contribution limit is phased out for couples with modified adjusted gross income above certain levels.
  • Tax benefits: Contributions to a spousal Roth IRA are made with after-tax dollars, meaning you don’t get an immediate tax deduction. However, the money grows tax-free, and withdrawals in retirement are generally tax-free as well. So, this can be a valuable tax planning strategy, especially if you expect to be in a higher tax bracket in retirement than you are now.
  • Withdrawal rules: Withdrawals from a spousal Roth IRA are subject to the same rules as a regular Roth IRA. If you withdraw earnings before age 59 1/2 or before your account has been open for five years, you may be subject to taxes and penalties. However, you can always withdraw your contributions tax and penalty-free.
  • Estate planning: A spousal Roth IRA can be a valuable tool for estate planning, as the funds can be passed on to the surviving spouse without triggering taxes or penalties. This can be especially beneficial if the surviving spouse is in a lower tax bracket than the deceased spouse.

Eligibility

  • You are married and file taxes jointly.
  • The individual making the Roth IRA contribution must use earned income.
  • Make less than $228,000 as a household. Starting in 2024 this number will increase to $240,000

When Can You Withdraw From A Roth IRA?

Qualified Distributions

You can take your money from a Roth IRA without taxes or penalties. For example, if you only take out what you put in, the retirement savings is not taxable, and there are no penalties. This is known as a qualified distribution.

If you have a Roth account and want to get the money out of it penalty-free when you are older, it must happen at least five years after the first time you put money in. To receive withdrawals (free of income taxes), the money has to come out under one of these conditions:

  • Owners are at least 59½ when they take money from their Roth IRAs.
  • The distributed assets must be used to buy, build, or rebuild a first home. This can only happen for $10,000 per lifetime.
  • The Roth IRA distributions can happen after they become disabled.
  • The beneficiary of inherited Roth IRAs will get the money after that person dies.

5-Year Rule

When you withdraw money from your account, it may be taxed. The percentage of taxable income depends on how old you are. If you have met the 5-year Rule, there is no tax or penalty when withdrawing your account.

You’ve waited at least five years.
  • Younger than 59½: Earnings are taxed and penalized by 10% (Early Withdrawal Penalty). However, you can avoid taxes and penalties if you use the money to buy your first home. You can also avoid taxes if you have a disability or die.
  • Age 59½ and older: No taxes. No penalties.
You have not waited for at least five years.
  • Younger than 59½: Earnings are taxable compensation and are penalized by 10% (Early Withdrawal Penalty). However, you can avoid penalties if you use the money to buy your first home. You can also avoid penalties if you have a disability, die, or use the withdrawal for qualified education expenses.
  • Age 59½ and older: You are paying the taxes but avoiding the penalties.

Non-Qualified Distributions

If you take money from your Roth account too early, you may have to pay tax and a 10% penalty. The exceptions are:

  • Unreimbursed medical expenses. It is okay if you use the money to pay for medical bills that are more than 10% of your annual income.
  • If someone has lost their job, they might need to pay for their medical insurance.
  • The withdrawal is used for qualified higher-education expenses. This includes tuition, fees, books, supplies, and equipment required for enrollment or attendance.
  • You can get up to $5,000 for your pregnancy or adoption if you withdraw within one year of giving birth or adopting.
Roth Ira Basis

Roth Vs. Traditional IRA

When it comes to saving for retirement, many options are available. Two of the most popular options are Roth IRAs and traditional IRAs. Both have advantages and disadvantages, so it’s essential to understand the difference before choosing one.

  • With a traditional IRA, you pay income tax on the money when you withdraw it in retirement. However, you may be eligible for a tax deduction on your contribution.
  • With a Roth individual retirement account, you pay with post-taxed money when you contribute, but you don’t have to pay taxes when you withdraw it in retirement. As a result, Roth IRAs offer more tax benefits if you expect to be in a higher tax bracket when you retire.

If you’re unsure which option is correct, talk to a financial advisor who can help you make the best decision for your unique situation.

Roth Conversion: The Back Door Roth IRA

A Roth IRA conversion, or the Backdoor Roth IRA, allows owners to convert their traditional IRAs into Roth accounts. This provision allows investors to:

  • Pay the ordinary income tax on their tax-deferred savings, and earn interest-free income taxes.
  • Receive tax-free income when they retire.
  • Withdraw their contributions at any time without paying taxes.
  • Avoid required minimum distributions (RMD) in the future.

The “back door” strategy includes contributing to a traditional IRA and immediately converting to a Roth IRA. Once the conversion is complete, the owner must leave the funds untouched in the newly converted Roth IRA for five years; otherwise, they will pay a 10% penalty if they are under 59 1/2.

Roth Conversion Age Limit

Currently, there are no age limits for a Roth Conversion.

Can I roll Over A 401k To A Roth IRA?

If you have a 401k through your employer, you may also be able to roll those funds into a Roth IRA. When you do a rollover, you convert the money from your 401k into a Roth IRA. The amount you convert is taxed as regular income in the year you do the conversion. After that, all future growth is tax-free, and withdrawals are tax-free.

Free Tool: Roth IRA Calculator

Guaranteeing An Income For Life Without Taxes

Once the requirements are met, an owner can transfer their account into a Roth annuity with a lifetime income rider. The annuity will then distribute tax-free payments for the rest of the retiree’s or married retirees’ lifetimes, even after the Roth IRA has run out of money. The Roth IRA annuity is a great way to layer retirement income in addition to Social Security income while protecting against market volatility.

Younger investors can contribute to a Roth annuity for tax-free growth or convert their traditional IRAs into a Roth annuity and guarantee their future income during retirement. Eligible individuals should contribute as much money as possible to the savings account before making traditional IRA contributions.

Next Steps

A Roth annuity can provide a lifetime of tax-free income, making it an attractive retirement option. Contact us below to learn how an annuity could benefit you in retirement. We can help you find the right plan for your unique needs and walk you through the application process so you can rest easy knowing your retirement is taken care of.

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Questions From Our Readers

What is the Roth Basis?

The Roth IRA basis is the total amount of money you have contributed to your Roth IRA account. This includes any contributions you have made on an after-tax basis and any conversion amounts. The Roth IRA basis also includes any earnings on your contributions. When you take distributions from your Roth IRAs, you will only pay taxes on those above your basis.

Can Roth IRAs lose money?

Roth IRA investments can lose money if the account is set up traditionally with investment options (stocks, bonds, mutual funds). However, Roth IRA savings can not lose money if the account is set up as a fixed or fixed index annuity.

Is there a Roth IRA Tax on gains?

No. As long as the Roth IRA owner follows IRS guidelines, there are zero taxes owed on Roth IRA gains.

Do Roth IRAs earn interest?

Roth IRA accounts are a great way to save for retirement, but you may wonder if they earn interest. The answer is yes! A Roth IRA will accrue interest over time like any other savings account. The interest rate on your Roth IRA will depend on the financial institution where you open your account and the current market conditions. However, over time, the interest on your Roth IRA can add up, increasing your money available for retirement.

Should I use a Roth IRA as a savings account?

A Roth IRA can be a significant savings account if you are nearing retirement or are already retired. The most significant benefit of a Roth IRA is that you do not have to pay taxes on the money you withdraw.

Is it better to contribute to a retirement plan with money you paid taxes on or contribute to pre-tax accounts and receive tax deductions today?

If you contribute to a retirement plan with money you paid income tax already (Roth), you cannot take a deduction for those contributions today. However, the money in the Roth account will grow and be withdrawn tax-free in retirement. On the other hand, if you contribute to a pre-tax account (traditional IRA), you can take a deduction for your contributions today. However, you will be required to pay taxes on the money when you withdraw it in retirement.

Where should I put my money after I max out the contribution limit?

Once you’ve maxed out your contribution limit, you may wonder where to put your money next. One option is non-qualified annuities. Only the interest will be taxable income in retirement.

Roth ira basis definition

The original amount was contributed to a Roth IRA account.

What is the downside of a Roth IRA?

No upfront tax deduction.

Retirement savings options.

Retirement savings options.

Tax-free growth.

How does a Roth IRA affect your ordinary income tax in retirement?

How does a Roth IRA affect your ordinary income tax in retirement?

Contributions to a Roth IRA are not deductible, so they do not reduce your ordinary income taxes in the year you contribute. However, withdrawals taken after 59½ are generally tax-free in retirement, meaning they do not affect your ordinary income taxes.

Can I directly contribute to Roth IRA?

Yes, you can. Contributions to a Roth IRA are made directly with after-tax dollars and are not tax-deductible. However, the earnings in the account grow tax-free, and qualified distributions in retirement are not subject to income taxes.

When should I fund my Roth IRA?

Roth IRA contributions should be made before the filing deadline of each tax year to be eligible for the previous year’s contribution limit. However, for most taxpayers, you can fund your Roth IRA any time before the filing deadline.

What are the benefits of a Roth account?

With a Roth account, your earnings are tax-free, and qualified distributions in retirement are not subject to income taxes. Additionally, contributions can be withdrawn anytime without penalty or tax liability.

Can an IRA annuity be converted to a Roth IRA annuity?

Yes, it is possible to convert an IRA annuity to a Roth IRA annuity. To do this, you would transfer the IRA annuity to a new annuity. On the transfer form, you should elect a Roth IRA, which instructs the new insurance company to convert the funds from a traditional IRA format to a Roth IRA format. This conversion is a taxable event, meaning the amount converted from the traditional IRA to the Roth IRA will be subject to income taxes in the year of the conversion. However, future withdrawals from the Roth IRA annuity, if made in accordance with the rules, will be tax-free.

Is it possible to do a partial Roth IRA conversion on an IRA annuity?

Yes, some insurance companies allow for a partial Roth IRA conversion from an IRA annuity.

Are contributions to a 401(k) and Roth IRA calculated based on your gross pay, and not your net pay?

Yes, contributions to a 401(k) and Roth IRA are calculated based on your gross pay.

Are all Roth IRAs invested in stocks?

No, not all Roth IRAs are invested in stocks. You have the option to invest in various financial instruments within a Roth IRA, including fixed annuities and Certificates of Deposit (CDs). Roth IRA fixed annuities can provide a guaranteed interest rate and a more stable, predictable return. At the same time, Roth IRA CDs also offer guaranteed interest rates and are typically considered safe, low-risk investments.

How does a Roth IRA work?

A Roth IRA is a retirement savings account where you can invest post-tax dollars, and your earnings grow tax-free. When you make withdrawals during retirement, they are also tax-free, as long as specific conditions are satisfied. Contribution limits and income eligibility requirements apply. Taking out funds early might lead to taxes and penalties, except in certain situations.

Shawn Plummer, CRPC

Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor

Shawn Plummer is a Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor, insurance agent, and annuity broker with over 14 years of first-hand experience with annuities and insurance. Since beginning his journey in 2009, he has been pivotal in selling and educating about annuities and insurance products. Still, he has also played an instrumental role in training financial advisors for a prestigious Fortune Global 500 insurance company, Allianz. His insights and expertise have made him a sought-after voice in the industry, leading to features in renowned publications such as Time Magazine, Bloomberg, Entrepreneur, Yahoo! Finance, MSN, SmartAsset, The Simple Dollar, U.S. News and World Report, Women’s Health Magazine, and many more. Shawn’s driving ambition? To simplify retirement planning, he ensures his clients understand their choices and secure the best insurance coverage at unbeatable rates.

The Annuity Expert is an independent online insurance agency servicing consumers across the United States. The goal is to help you take the guesswork out of retirement planning and find the best insurance coverage at the cheapest rates

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